Fluency in Microsoft Excel is not just a nice-to-have: it’s a requirement for many jobs and considered a foundational job skill. If it’s been a while since you’ve used Excel, or you’ve never quite mastered it, I encourage you to get comfortable with this tool. When you’re in a job interview, you’ll want to demonstrate your mastery of Excel by describing a recent project where you used it and talking about the Excel refresher you just took.

 

There are many resources out there, including friends and family members, you could use to brush-up your Excel skills.  Contextures.com is a great resource – I receive their weekly tips and training suggestions.

 

Excel – My Favorite Function

I use Excel at work every day and have a few favorite tricks I’ll share. You’ll need to use your computer, instead of a mobile device, so you can follow along with me for our Excel mini-lesson.

 

Sorting and Filtering –

 

This is where Excel really shines for me!  When I have a spreadsheet full of numbers, it’s useless until I can extract some type of insight out of it. Sorting and filtering the data so I can look at it from different angles or drill down in one area is the best way I’ve found to bring data to life.

 

Do this along with me so you can really learn how this works.

 

Step #1: Get a sample excel file from http://www.contextures.com/xlSampleData01.html

 

Step #2: Copy and paste the data file labeled “Sample Data” into excel so we can work with it (step-by-step instructions are on the page)

 

Step #3: Save the file so you’ll have it to practice with

 

Step #4: At the top left of your data file is a gray triangle – click this to highlight your entire worksheet:

 

Step #5: On the far-right side of the tool bar across the top of your spreadsheet, find the “Sort & Filter” drop-down menu, click on it, then select “Filter”.

 

You’ll see drop-downs that look like little triangles appear in the corner of the top cell of each of your data columns:

 

Now we’re ready to filter the data! This is really exciting!

 

Step #6: This table contains sales data for an imaginary stationary company. The sales are listed in chronological order, but let’s filter this table to see the sales for each region so we can determine which region is doing the best.

 

Click on the drop-down in the “Region” cell, then click on “Select all” to deselect this and then click on “Central”. Now you see just the orders for the Central region.

 

Step#7: Let’s drill down on each rep’s orders. Click on the drop-down in column C. Deselect “Select All” and then select Andrews. Now you can see just Andrews orders in the Central region.

 

If you look at the bottom of your table, you’ll see that Excel has tallied the number of records for you: There are 4 records showing when you filter on Andrews in the Central region.

 

Step #8: To go back to your full data table, select the drop-down for the columns where you have filtered the data and click on “select All”. Your full data table should re-appear.

 

Step #9: Play around with the data table and find some different ways to sort the data and gather insights from the table.

 

 

Now you know how to filter data in an Excel table, which is a great skill to have!

 

Bonus Excel Tip:   When you have a data table, shade the first row a light color and bold the text to make your header row stand out. If there’s one column of data in particular that you want to highlight, shade it so that your reader’s eye will immediately be drawn to the important part of the table. Always make your tables visually appealing.

 

I encourage you to update your Excel skills.  Check your local market for refresher courses or there are plenty of online tutorials.

 

Need some data to practice with and a reason to use Excel? Put your household budget in Excel so you can get your finances in order while brushing up on this extremely useful tool.

 

 

 

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