LinkedIn Tips: Get Your Profile Up and Running

LinkedIn Tips: Get Your Profile Up and Running

Whether you are re-launching your career, making a career change or bringing in more business for your own venture, you simply must be “LinkedIn” these days. Use these tips to update your profile and get the most out of your LinkedIn experience.

Attitude

Approach LinkedIn as a professional reconnecting with colleagues in the working world and finding ways to make a meaningful contribution. This tilt in attitude will help you enter with confidence instead of as someone who wants a job. Just as you are eager to expand your network, so are others.  People will welcome your invitations to connect.

Sign up for a free LinkedIn account

First things first. A free account is all you need. You can decide after you’re using it regularly if you need the deluxe model and are willing to pay for it.

Turn off your Notification

Start by clicking on your picture icon on the bar at the top of the page. Go to Settings & Privacy, then scroll down to ” Share job changes, education changes, and work anniversaries from profile”. Change that setting to “No”. This is just while you’re getting set up. We want to prevent your network from being notified of every change you make as you update your profile as you build out your page. Once your profile is to your liking, go back and turn this notification to “Yes”. You’ll want to notify your network when you are adding a skill, a recommendation or a new position (!), but not right now while you are completing your profile and making edits. Build out your profile before you make lots of connections. Then start by connecting with people you know.

Create/Update your Profile

Now for the heavy lifting. Recruiters and hiring managers view your LinkedIn profile as the new version of the resume, and it could be the first thing they see – even before there is a job posting to respond to. So update your profile the right way – and do this before making connections – but know that your profile is an evolving creation that you will be editing regularly.

Photo

Even a clown uses a professional photo! You are selling the image that will get you that job, whether it is for a data manager or a clown. A professional photo is important because you’ll be reconnecting with people from the past and with people who have just interviewed you and might need to be reminded of who you are. In fact, professional photos are so important that we make it a priority at The Back to Business Women’s Conference to have a professional photographer on-hand to take photos for everyone. If you need to get yours done, I urge you to spend the money to have it done professionally.  This is an investment that is well worth it. There is data to show that profiles with pictures get a much higher percentage of looks and connection invitations.

Headline

The first thing people see after your name and photo is your headline. It is not just a job title — pack it with keywords to attract others to read your profile.  It does not need to be your current position (or lack thereof) since that will appear again under Experience. It should be strong and personal but not too salesy. Some examples include:

  • Experienced Project Manager with pharmaceutical industry experience
  • Competitive Intelligence Professional who applies data analytics to enhance decision making
  • Certified Professional Facilitator | Helping Teams to get from Chaos to Clarity
  • or just pack your “title” with keywords that relate to the job you want and the skills you have. Here’s an example:

Talent Management | Leadership Development | Succession Planning | Diversity & Inclusion | Executive Coaching

URL

Customize your profile URL to include your name by following these steps:

  • Click on your profile in the left sidebar to edit your URL.
  • Then click on the blue pencil icon next to the box that says “More”.
  • Scroll all the way down to the “Contact Info” section of the pop-up box to select your own customized URL. Keep it as simple as possible.
  • Then add your personalized LinkedIn URL to your resume and email closing when sending out professional correspondence.

Keywords

Take a moment right now to look up keywords that are applicable to your field of interest if you haven’t already done this for your resume. Use LinkedIn profiles for people in your line of work and job descriptions to find several keywords they use and then be sure to use them in your summary. When you use keywords in many areas of your LinkedIn profile, recruiters have a better chance of finding you.

Summary

This is an essential place to tell readers who you are and what makes you great. Be creative with this – you want to stand out and show enthusiasm – but use those keywords here and keep it professional.

Experience

Use your updated resume to populate your Experience section with your work history, education, and certifications. Pull out your biggest accomplishments at each job you’ve held to add to your LinkedIn “Experience” section. Don’t list all of your responsibilities: You just want to highlight your accomplishments here.  Be sure to include new volunteer positions, skills training and organization memberships. The Back to Business Women’s Conference is a professional development opportunity, and as such can be included under the Interests or Organizations section of your LinkedIn profile. Also, be sure to join our LinkedIn group called “Back to Business Women’s Conference” and contribute to or start a discussion here.

Connections

So now you’re ready to start using LinkedIn and making connections. Turn your notification back on. Start with low-hanging fruit – connect with people that LinkedIn recommends for you. You are looking for quality connections: If there is someone you’d like to meet, you can ask for an introduction from a common connection. Set yourself a goal to make a specific number of new connections each day and track your progress. These could be former co-workers, friends and professional acquaintances. When you reach out be sure to note what they are doing and offer a kind word or a quality recommendation for a fantastic former co-worker. Remember that right now as you are connecting, you should be seeing how you can help them.

Tip: When you are requesting a connection with someone (especially someone you don’t know personally), be sure to include a personal note in the connection request that establishes why you want to connect.  The generic LinkedIn request of “I’d like to add you to my professional network” is so impersonal!

Recommendations

Recommendations are testimonials to your service, expertise and skills. Ask others for recommendations and be willing to write a recommendation for them as well. Former co-workers, managers and clients are the best people to ask. If you’ve been out of the paid workforce for a while, think about asking people you’ve volunteered with to write you a recommendation.

Groups and Online Learning

Join a group (such as the Back to Business Women’s Conference group) under the Interests tab and get involved in a discussion. This will help to make you known to others in your field so be sure you are contributing in a constructive manner! Belonging to several groups but not participating will not help you. Similarly, check out some of the online learning opportunities – LinkedIn Learning offers online training on a variety of topics and adds completion links automatically to your LinkedIn Profile. Join your alumni organizations’ group, local networking groups and a professional group that interests you.

Use and Update

Use LinkedIn on a regular basis – the more you use it, the more likely you will come up on others’ radar. Keep your profile up-to-date and be sure to add any new skills, training programs or professional affiliations. Offer endorsements of skills for those who are deserving and recommendations where appropriate. Your connections will likely do the same for you.

Research

Use LinkedIn to research potential companies and expand your list of target companies. Get to know everything about them and make new connections who work there. Know where your friends are working and check out who they’re connected to.

LinkedIn is another social media outlet that will demand some time upfront.  Knowing how people make a living is a good use of your time for your own future, as is having them find out about you.

 

 

 

Ace Your Video Interview

Ace Your Video Interview

As employers look to speed up their hiring processes, more are turning to video interviewing in order to screen candidates. Video interviewing can take many different forms and for the purposes of this article, I’m referring to an interview in which a candidate uses a video interviewing tool to respond to questions asked of them on screen.

 

Since interviewing with a machine is different than interviewing with an actual human, here are a few things you need to know to ace your video interview:

 

  • Be good – fast! Video interview platforms promise recruiters the ability to quickly scan through large numbers of video interviews. Translation: if they don’t like your video immediately, they’ll skip to the next candidate. It’s not only critical for you to make a positive first impression but to do so quickly. Don’t save your best stuff for later in the interview. Have an introduction that you have practiced and can deliver skillfully to grab the recruiter’s attention and ensure they keep watching.

 

  • Questions will be very specific and easy to understand since you have no way to ask for clarification during a video interview. The good news is that you should expect the usual interview questions such as “Tell me about your work experience”, “Why are you interested in this job/this company” and “What do you know about our company/our products?” Since you can anticipate the questions, there is no reason to not be 100% prepared.

 

  • Recruiters are looking for the same qualities in candidates whether the interview is conducted in person or over a video interview platform. Video Recruit is one such platform and they promise recruiters “you get an immediate and accurate insight into their character, competencies and communication skills.”

 

  • Speaking of communication skills, yours are on full display during a video interview. Again, practice is essential for you to shine in this environment. Record yourself answering interview questions with your phone and then evaluate your performance. Although you may not enjoy hearing your own recorded voice, this will give you the chance to notice any communication quirks you have. Did you say “um” or “like” more than you should? Cutting out these filler words from your speech goes a long way toward helping you make a great impression as a polished communicator. Did you ramble on too long? Not address the question that was asked? The only way to find out is to video yourself and then watch.

 

  • Keep it brief! You are likely to get as many as 6 questions during a video interview and will have a predetermined time period to answer each one, which may be as long as 5 minutes. Ever heard someone talk for 5 full minutes about themselves? BORING! Even if you are allowed 5 minutes, I suggest you do not take it all. 2-3 minutes should be plenty of time to answer a question, especially if you are prepared with a concise answer. Be aware of how much time you have to respond to the question and wrap it up before you run out of time. Your awareness of and ability to manage time is something recruiters will take notice of.

 

  • It’s a level playing field. The good news is that in a video interview all candidates for a given position will receive the same questions and have the same amount of time to answer them. This removes some of the potential bias that can be present in the interview process but also removes your ability to connect on a personal level with your interviewer. Your challenge thus becomes demonstrating your human side in your recorded answers. Be sure to inject some warmth into your responses and don’t forget to smile!

 

  • You choose the setting of your interview – choose wisely! Make sure you’re in a quiet place and pay attention to what’s behind you as a busy background will be distracting. I suggest being seated at a desk or table that replicates a professional setting. Have a glass of water nearby in case you need a sip between questions. And, naturally, dress appropriately for a professional interview.

 

  • Pay attention to the rate of your speech – don’t talk too fast! Interview nerves can cause you to speed up but take a deep breath and remind yourself to slow down so you can be understood. Also, be sure you’re speaking loud enough to be heard and don’t mumble!

 

Remember, the 3 keys to acing a video interview are practice, practice and practice. Your preparation should help you start strong which is key in this format. A recruiter won’t watch your whole interview if you don’t make a great first impression.

 

Video interviewing is a speedy way for recruiters to see lots of candidates. Let your personality shine through and focus your answers on what you can do for the company so they can quickly and easily evaluate your fit for the position.

 

 

Excel – My Favorite Function

Excel – My Favorite Function

Fluency in Microsoft Excel is not just a nice-to-have: it’s a requirement for many jobs and considered a foundational job skill. If it’s been a while since you’ve used Excel, or you’ve never quite mastered it, I encourage you to get comfortable with this tool. When you’re in a job interview, you’ll want to demonstrate your mastery of Excel by describing a recent project where you used it and talking about the Excel refresher you just took.

 

There are many resources out there, including friends and family members, you could use to brush-up your Excel skills.  Contextures.com is a great resource – I receive their weekly tips and training suggestions.

 

Excel – My Favorite Function

I use Excel at work every day and have a few favorite tricks I’ll share. You’ll need to use your computer, instead of a mobile device, so you can follow along with me for our Excel mini-lesson.

 

Sorting and Filtering –

 

This is where Excel really shines for me!  When I have a spreadsheet full of numbers, it’s useless until I can extract some type of insight out of it. Sorting and filtering the data so I can look at it from different angles or drill down in one area is the best way I’ve found to bring data to life.

 

Do this along with me so you can really learn how this works.

 

Step #1: Get a sample excel file from http://www.contextures.com/xlSampleData01.html

 

Step #2: Copy and paste the data file labeled “Sample Data” into excel so we can work with it (step-by-step instructions are on the page)

 

Step #3: Save the file so you’ll have it to practice with

 

Step #4: At the top left of your data file is a gray triangle – click this to highlight your entire worksheet:

 

Step #5: On the far-right side of the tool bar across the top of your spreadsheet, find the “Sort & Filter” drop-down menu, click on it, then select “Filter”.

 

You’ll see drop-downs that look like little triangles appear in the corner of the top cell of each of your data columns:

 

Now we’re ready to filter the data! This is really exciting!

 

Step #6: This table contains sales data for an imaginary stationary company. The sales are listed in chronological order, but let’s filter this table to see the sales for each region so we can determine which region is doing the best.

 

Click on the drop-down in the “Region” cell, then click on “Select all” to deselect this and then click on “Central”. Now you see just the orders for the Central region.

 

Step#7: Let’s drill down on each rep’s orders. Click on the drop-down in column C. Deselect “Select All” and then select Andrews. Now you can see just Andrews orders in the Central region.

 

If you look at the bottom of your table, you’ll see that Excel has tallied the number of records for you: There are 4 records showing when you filter on Andrews in the Central region.

 

Step #8: To go back to your full data table, select the drop-down for the columns where you have filtered the data and click on “select All”. Your full data table should re-appear.

 

Step #9: Play around with the data table and find some different ways to sort the data and gather insights from the table.

 

 

Now you know how to filter data in an Excel table, which is a great skill to have!

 

Bonus Excel Tip:   When you have a data table, shade the first row a light color and bold the text to make your header row stand out. If there’s one column of data in particular that you want to highlight, shade it so that your reader’s eye will immediately be drawn to the important part of the table. Always make your tables visually appealing.

 

I encourage you to update your Excel skills.  Check your local market for refresher courses or there are plenty of online tutorials.

 

Need some data to practice with and a reason to use Excel? Put your household budget in Excel so you can get your finances in order while brushing up on this extremely useful tool.

 

 

 

Greatest Hits:  Tips for Returning to Work

Greatest Hits: Tips for Returning to Work

Looking for a job is your job now. Schedule time to do this work and stick to the schedule.

Spend some time up front thinking about what you want to do. You don’t have to narrow it down to one option – recognize that there are multiple possibilities that could work for you and be flexible enough to change course as you learn more about yourself and the job market throughout your job search. My favorite book on this subject: Designing Your Life by Bill Burnett and Dave Evans.

Invest in yourself. A few things worth spending money on as you restart your career are a killer resume, a professional LinkedIn photo, a course to update your skills, and a professional outfit and shoes for interviews.

Set goals for yourself and write them down: Make 3 phone calls a day, schedule 2 informational interviews each week, find 3 interesting new companies per day. Reward yourself with a healthy treat for meeting your goals.

Realize that this can take longer than you’d like. Persevere. Learn from your mistakes – because you will make some. Pick yourself up and keep going, even when it gets frustrating.

Set up informational interviews. You will learn a lot and grow your network by doing informational interviews. (And you thought these were just for kids!) Buying someone a cup of coffee and learning from them is a highly productive way to spend job-searching time.

Have a supportive network as you transition back to the paid workforce. Looking for a job is hard work and it can be frustrating. You will need a tribe to help you get through it. Plan to meet regularly with them – coffee every Friday morning, for example. Keep each other accountable and encourage each other.

Get out from behind your computer! You will not find a job from the comfort of your home – this I promise you. You must get out and talk to people if you want a job. This can be uncomfortable at first, but it gets easier and you may even enjoy it as you get better at it.

Your job will come from your network, not from a job posting you saw on the internet. Start building your network today and you will reap the benefits of being a connected person for the rest of your career.

Networking is all about building relationships with people – it is a give and take. You may not realize it, but you’ve been networking your whole life and you already know how to do it. Be interesting and interested in other people and always ask what you can do for them.

Don’t let the “what if’s” keep you from pursuing a job you want. When Mom returns to work, the entire family has to adjust – and they will. “What if I can’t pick up at school every day?” and “What if I can’t make dinner every night?” are valid concerns, but don’t hold back on getting a job you’d like because there’s a chance that others in your house will be inconvenienced. You can outsource almost anything and planning ahead will solve a lot of these dilemmas.

Get Back to Business! Back to Business holds Meet-ups and workshops in the Raleigh, NC area and offers useful information and resources in blogs and through ebooks in order to help women returning to work. Visit us at www.backtobusinessconference.com.

 

3 LinkedIn Smart Strategies You Can Do TODAY

3 LinkedIn Smart Strategies You Can Do TODAY

I’d like to address LinkedIn and how important it is in your job search from a slightly different angle and share some smart strategies for using LinkedIn as a job searcher that you can do today.

Remember, LinkedIn is your ticket to finding out who works where and who’s hiring. For a job seeker, this is important information.

Here are 3 things to try on LinkedIn today:

 

TIP #1: Look up your dream company using the feature that allows you to see “people who work at…”. Are you connected to anyone who works there? If yes, send them a message asking for a phone call. It can read something like this:

 

Hi Sally,

I hope you’re doing well. I’m considering my next career move and have always been really interested in XYZ Company because my background in project management seems like a great fit for the roles XYZ is currently hiring for. Would you have 15 minutes during the next week or two for a phone call so I could ask you a few questions about the company and hear about your experience there?

Thanks in advance!

Katie

 

If you aren’t connected to anyone there, look at the second-degree connections and pick out someone you know who has a connection at the company. This can be either someone in the department you’re interested in (preferably) or a recruiter. Send a message to your connection asking for an introduction.

Here’s a template you can use:

Hi Sally,

I see you’re connected to Jane Smith on LinkedIn and Jane works at XYZ where I’m really interested in getting a job. Would you be able to introduce Jane and me via email or LinkedIn? My email address is xxx. Thanks for your help!

Katie

 

Did you try it? It’s pretty easy, right? Now try it a few more times – your goal is to expand your network and this will take work every day. Once you get an introduction or schedule a phone call, be ready with great questions, your elevator pitch, and an offer of “what can I do for you?”

 

 

Tip #2: For our next trick, message someone you haven’t spoken to in a long time to keep the connection fresh. Just a very brief “hello” is all we’re after here. Here’s an example:

 

Hi Bill,

It’s been a while, but I’ve enjoyed following your success on LinkedIn and hope things are going well for you at XYZ Company. I’m working on my return to work after taking a career break and I’m really excited about the possibilities!

Katie

 

Why do this? Because you never know who Bill knows or what kind of help he may be able to provide. If nothing else, you’ve done what people always say they plan to do (keep in touch with their network) but never seem to get around to actually doing – so good for you! Your contacts will recognize that this is smart networking and give you credit for it. Plus, if you need to reach out to Bill with a specific request in the near future, it won’t be so awkward because you’ve checked in with him recently.

 

Tip #3: Ask for recommendations! Having multiple recommendations is a great way to fill out your profile and asking for them is easy. Use the “Ask for recommendations” feature on LinkedIn. Or you can send your request via email. Allow me to get you started:

 

Hi Sally, I’m planning my next career move and filling out my LinkedIn profile as part of the process. Would you write a brief recommendation for me? I was hoping you could reference our work together as project managers/my technical skills/the great teamwork we had while working together at X Company. I’d be happy to do the same for you so please let me know if that would be helpful. Thank you!

A few things to keep in mind about your request:

  • Be specific about what you’d like people to comment on. This helps them write something quickly and gets you just what you want on your LinkedIn profile.
  • Offer to reciprocate.
  • Keep your request brief!
  • Don’t shy away from asking people for recommendations even if it’s been many years since you worked together. They’ll remember you and the work you did.

 

Try these out today. Why today? Because doing this now while it’s fresh in your mind is your best bet for getting it done. Also, because these are things you need to do on a regular basis and you’ll get more comfortable as you do them more often. Start today and then do them again tomorrow.

Remember, your job as a job seeker is to expand your network. If you’re returning to work after a career break you’re going to have to tap into your network to find your next opportunity and LinkedIn is a great way to do this.

 

When not offering tips on making LinkedIn the focus of your job search…well, actually, because LinkedIn IS that important, Katie can always be found offering LinkedIn assistance to her UNC MBA Candidates and women like her who are returning to the workforce. For more information and tips, check out www.backtobusinessconference.com.

Recruiters’ Feedback

Recruiters’ Feedback

Interviewing for jobs can be nerve-wracking! In my role as a Career Coach at a top-20 business school, I hear from multiple recruiters each year about the things candidates did well (and not so well) during job interviews. Here are three things we hear from recruiters that might help you avoid making some common interview mistakes and get the offer:

 

#1 Bring Your Energy! Maybe candidates are trying so hard to be “professional” that they forget to let their enthusiasm for the company or the position shine through. Or maybe nerves get the best of some interviewees and they just can’t relax enough to show their excitement. Whatever the reason, your interviewers are investing their time and resources bringing you in for an interview and they want to see that you’re excited to be there.

Here are some ways you can show your energy:

  • Clearly articulate how happy you are to be interviewing for the position.
  • Smile! It sounds basic, but in a pressure situation you might forget this most basic way of connecting with other people.
  • Pay attention to your body language – sit up straight, talk with your hands, speak clearly and at an appropriate volume.

 

#2 Be prepared to talk about why you’re interested in this company. You’ll need to do your research to answer this question well. This is your chance to show that you’re the kind of person who does their homework and comes prepared. It’s also a chance to compliment what you admire about the company and demonstrate that you’re self-aware enough to know why you’d be a good fit for them.

Here’s how you can show your interest:

  • Have 3 reasons why you love this company in mind when you walk into your interview.
  • Come prepared to talk about how your strengths match up to what the position requires.
  • Answer this question in terms of what you can do for them, not what they can do for you.

 

#3 Ask insightful questions at the end of the interview. A recruiter once told us that she interviewed a candidate whose questions for her hit on the three things that kept her up at night. This candidate had so thoroughly researched the company and the position he was interviewing for that he was able to zero in on the business issues that they were grappling with and ask thoughtful questions about them. He got the job!

Here’s how you can ask insightful questions:

  • Know who the competition is, what the trends are in the industry and what, if any, threats exist to the way they currently do business. Use this information to formulate questions that show that you did your homework.
  • Research online by reading industry blogs and the company’s website and Linkedin page. Supplement this knowledge by talking to people you know who work at the company to get the inside scoop.
  • Be sure to mention during your interview that you spoke with people who work at the company as part of your preparation. This shows you went the extra mile to understand their business.

 

The keys to interviewing well are preparation and practice. Be sure to bring your energy, do your research so you know why you’re a good fit for the company and ask smart questions of your interviewers.  Get a list of common interview questions and record yourself giving answers so you can hear how you sound. Enlist a friend to give you a mock interview and some honest feedback.

Then get out there and show ‘em what you’re made of!

 

When Katie’s not working to place MBA candidates, she’s writing articles, conducting workshops and MeetUps, and preparing courses to help women like her transition back into the workforce.  Find out what’s going on at www.backtobusinessconference.com.