Keep Track of Your Career Break Activities

Keep Track of Your Career Break Activities

While you’re on a career break, it’s critical that you keep a list of things you’re doing that will help you make the case that you are a better employee because of your break. 

Quick! Grab a pen and write down 5 things you’ve done while out of the paid workforce that a future employer might be interested in. 

Need help? Here are some ideas to jumpstart your list: 

-took an online course (LinkedIn Learning, Coursera, etc.)

-kept up a professional certification

-developed a new skill (what was it and how did you develop it?)

-took a course at a community college, a bootcamp, or anywhere

-managed a project at your kids school, your church, or a non-profit

-managed volunteers

-joined an industry association and attended their meetings or continuing education courses

-volunteered for a political campaign supporting a cause or a candidate that you believed in

-taught something (such as faith formation classes at your place of worship)

-started a group to get people with common interests connected

-joined a book club and participated in monthly discussions

-served on your homeowners association

-organized social events for an organization/school/church/neighborhood you are connected to

-took on gig or project work

-attended a conference that inspired you, taught you something, or kept you in touch with your profession or network

Why is this important? 

For many reasons! For starters, as you update your resume you’ll draw on this list to fill the gap in your employment history. It’s also important because when you get to the interview stage of your job search, you will be asked what you did while you were out of the paid workforce. It will be up to you to tell a compelling story that convinces employers that you are a constant learner with a growth mindset. 

This week I met with a recruiter at a great local company and we talked about hiring women (and men!) who are returning to work after a career break. She’s interviewed lots of career relaunchers: The ones who rose to the top are those that spoke about their time out of the workforce as a time of growth and convinced her that they were busy using skills that transfer well to the workplace.

My advice to you: Keep track of all the things you do while on a career break. 

Start a google doc or a page in your journal to list every project and volunteer post you take on along with the skills you used and the outcome of the project. Don’t forget the outcome! If you’re ready to return to work and you haven’t been keeping track, no worries! Start your list now and spend the next few days adding to the list as you remember what’s been keeping you so busy all this time. 

What if my list stinks? 🙂

OK, say you start your list and you decide it’s not impressive. Start doing list-building activities today by finding a course to enroll in, a group to join or a volunteer activity that will help you grow. Here’s a link to my blog about resources for job seekers that contains some ideas for you. I repeat, start today! 

Being home with kids is a full-time job!

Yet so many of you manage to do this well in addition to volunteering, managing projects and improving yourselves on a daily basis. When I was a stay-at-home mom, I always marveled at how that title really missed the mark: I was never home! Between all the activities my children and I got involved in, I was constantly on-the-go. I even took a fencing class with one of my children, which let me to include “Beginning Fencer” under the Interests section at the bottom of my resume. I didn’t exactly learn practical job skills in the fencing class, but it was a great conversation starter! Also, it gave me the opportunity to talk about how my career break allowed me to explore some unique activities that expanded my mind and kept me physically fit. 

So start that list and keep adding to it as you craft your story around how you used your career break to get better and how that will benefit your future employer.

LinkedIn Tips: Get Your Profile Up and Running

LinkedIn Tips: Get Your Profile Up and Running

Whether you are re-launching your career, making a career change or bringing in more business for your own venture, you simply must be “LinkedIn” these days. Use these tips to update your profile and get the most out of your LinkedIn experience.

Attitude

Approach LinkedIn as a professional reconnecting with colleagues in the working world and finding ways to make a meaningful contribution. This tilt in attitude will help you enter with confidence instead of as someone who wants a job. Just as you are eager to expand your network, so are others.  People will welcome your invitations to connect.

Sign up for a free LinkedIn account

First things first. A free account is all you need. You can decide after you’re using it regularly if you need the deluxe model and are willing to pay for it.

Turn off your Notification

Start by clicking on your picture icon on the bar at the top of the page. Go to Settings & Privacy, then scroll down to ” Share job changes, education changes, and work anniversaries from profile”. Change that setting to “No”. This is just while you’re getting set up. We want to prevent your network from being notified of every change you make as you update your profile as you build out your page. Once your profile is to your liking, go back and turn this notification to “Yes”. You’ll want to notify your network when you are adding a skill, a recommendation or a new position (!), but not right now while you are completing your profile and making edits. Build out your profile before you make lots of connections. Then start by connecting with people you know.

Create/Update your Profile

Now for the heavy lifting. Recruiters and hiring managers view your LinkedIn profile as the new version of the resume, and it could be the first thing they see – even before there is a job posting to respond to. So update your profile the right way – and do this before making connections – but know that your profile is an evolving creation that you will be editing regularly.

Photo

Even a clown uses a professional photo! You are selling the image that will get you that job, whether it is for a data manager or a clown. A professional photo is important because you’ll be reconnecting with people from the past and with people who have just interviewed you and might need to be reminded of who you are. In fact, professional photos are so important that we make it a priority at The Back to Business Women’s Conference to have a professional photographer on-hand to take photos for everyone. If you need to get yours done, I urge you to spend the money to have it done professionally.  This is an investment that is well worth it. There is data to show that profiles with pictures get a much higher percentage of looks and connection invitations.

Headline

The first thing people see after your name and photo is your headline. It is not just a job title — pack it with keywords to attract others to read your profile.  It does not need to be your current position (or lack thereof) since that will appear again under Experience. It should be strong and personal but not too salesy. Some examples include:

  • Experienced Project Manager with pharmaceutical industry experience
  • Competitive Intelligence Professional who applies data analytics to enhance decision making
  • Certified Professional Facilitator | Helping Teams to get from Chaos to Clarity
  • or just pack your “title” with keywords that relate to the job you want and the skills you have. Here’s an example:

Talent Management | Leadership Development | Succession Planning | Diversity & Inclusion | Executive Coaching

URL

Customize your profile URL to include your name by following these steps:

  • Click on your profile in the left sidebar to edit your URL.
  • Then click on the blue pencil icon next to the box that says “More”.
  • Scroll all the way down to the “Contact Info” section of the pop-up box to select your own customized URL. Keep it as simple as possible.
  • Then add your personalized LinkedIn URL to your resume and email closing when sending out professional correspondence.

Keywords

Take a moment right now to look up keywords that are applicable to your field of interest if you haven’t already done this for your resume. Use LinkedIn profiles for people in your line of work and job descriptions to find several keywords they use and then be sure to use them in your summary. When you use keywords in many areas of your LinkedIn profile, recruiters have a better chance of finding you.

Summary

This is an essential place to tell readers who you are and what makes you great. Be creative with this – you want to stand out and show enthusiasm – but use those keywords here and keep it professional.

Experience

Use your updated resume to populate your Experience section with your work history, education, and certifications. Pull out your biggest accomplishments at each job you’ve held to add to your LinkedIn “Experience” section. Don’t list all of your responsibilities: You just want to highlight your accomplishments here.  Be sure to include new volunteer positions, skills training and organization memberships. The Back to Business Women’s Conference is a professional development opportunity, and as such can be included under the Interests or Organizations section of your LinkedIn profile. Also, be sure to join our LinkedIn group called “Back to Business Women’s Conference” and contribute to or start a discussion here.

Connections

So now you’re ready to start using LinkedIn and making connections. Turn your notification back on. Start with low-hanging fruit – connect with people that LinkedIn recommends for you. You are looking for quality connections: If there is someone you’d like to meet, you can ask for an introduction from a common connection. Set yourself a goal to make a specific number of new connections each day and track your progress. These could be former co-workers, friends and professional acquaintances. When you reach out be sure to note what they are doing and offer a kind word or a quality recommendation for a fantastic former co-worker. Remember that right now as you are connecting, you should be seeing how you can help them.

Tip: When you are requesting a connection with someone (especially someone you don’t know personally), be sure to include a personal note in the connection request that establishes why you want to connect.  The generic LinkedIn request of “I’d like to add you to my professional network” is so impersonal!

Recommendations

Recommendations are testimonials to your service, expertise and skills. Ask others for recommendations and be willing to write a recommendation for them as well. Former co-workers, managers and clients are the best people to ask. If you’ve been out of the paid workforce for a while, think about asking people you’ve volunteered with to write you a recommendation.

Groups and Online Learning

Join a group (such as the Back to Business Women’s Conference group) under the Interests tab and get involved in a discussion. This will help to make you known to others in your field so be sure you are contributing in a constructive manner! Belonging to several groups but not participating will not help you. Similarly, check out some of the online learning opportunities – LinkedIn Learning offers online training on a variety of topics and adds completion links automatically to your LinkedIn Profile. Join your alumni organizations’ group, local networking groups and a professional group that interests you.

Use and Update

Use LinkedIn on a regular basis – the more you use it, the more likely you will come up on others’ radar. Keep your profile up-to-date and be sure to add any new skills, training programs or professional affiliations. Offer endorsements of skills for those who are deserving and recommendations where appropriate. Your connections will likely do the same for you.

Research

Use LinkedIn to research potential companies and expand your list of target companies. Get to know everything about them and make new connections who work there. Know where your friends are working and check out who they’re connected to.

LinkedIn is another social media outlet that will demand some time upfront.  Knowing how people make a living is a good use of your time for your own future, as is having them find out about you.

 

 

 

5 Confidence-Boosting Tips To Fuel Your Return To Work

5 Confidence-Boosting Tips To Fuel Your Return To Work

 

I saw this sign on a shop in St. Augustine, FL during spring break.  Naturally, I went in.  Who wouldn’t?  Such confidence!

 

What does your sign say?  Are you open and awesome?  I’m willing to bet that you are, but I’m interested by the confidence gap I keep reading about and how some say that it’s preventing women from taking risks, reaching for that stretch job and speaking up enough.  So how to build up that confidence level when you may just be returning to work after a career break?  Read on for 5 confidence-boosting ideas that you can start practicing today.

 

5 Confidence-Boosting Ideas For You!

 

Confidence Booster #1: Transfer Your Confidence

We all have areas of our life where we feel more confident than others.  For some, work is their confidence comfort zone.  For others running the show at home is where they feel in-charge.  So what if we applied the confidence we exhibit at our confidence comfort zone to our less-confident zone?  For women returning to work after a career break and struggling to regain their professional self-assurance, I’d like you to apply your confidence in your non-professional pursuits to your job search and your professional life.  Here’s how: notice your posture, body language, the volume and tone of your voice when you’re taking care of business in a place where you feel like the boss.  The next time you’re heading into a professional event, a networking meeting, or an interview, recall that in-charge feeling.  You are the boss.

 

Why does confidence matter?    In “For Women to Rise, We Must Close the Confidence Gap”, author Margie Warrell argues that in the context of job-searching, a less-confident woman won’t apply for certain jobs if she doesn’t feel fully qualified.  You’ve probably all heard the statistic from a Hewlett-Packard internal report that men apply for a job when they meet only 60% of the qualifications, but women will only apply if they meet 100% of the qualifications.  Over the many years of a career, the cumulative effect of consistently not reaching for the next job or applying for one you have the potential to do can add up to tremendous missed opportunities, lower salary and fewer promotions.

 

Confidence Booster #2: Just Act!

The Atlantic Magazine cites perfectionism as “another confidence killer” in “The Confidence Gap” by Katty Kay and Claire  Shipman. “Study after study confirms that it is largely a female issue, one that extends through women’s entire lives. We don’t answer questions until we are totally sure of the answer, we don’t submit a report until we’ve edited it ad nauseam, and we don’t sign up for that triathlon unless we know we are faster and fitter than is required. We watch our male colleagues take risks, while we hold back until we’re sure we are perfectly ready and perfectly qualified. In order to become more confident, women need to stop thinking so much and just act.”

 

Margie Warrell had some of my favorite advice on the topic of exhibiting more confidence: “After working with thousands of women across diverse professions and cultural background, I’ve learned that nothing builds confidence in any arena more than stepping right into the middle of it…palms sweating, stomach knotted, beside the guys…despite the chorus of doubts urging you to play it safe in the stands…The only way to build confidence and courage is by acting with it.”   This is a modern-day echo of the famous Eleanor Roosevelt advice to “Do one thing every day that scares you.”

 

Confidence Booster #3: Pay Attention to the Words You Use

Your word choice can be a powerful signal of your confidence level.   Be cognizant that you’re presenting ideas in a way that is not apologetic or timid.  Don’t fear disagreement – a healthy exchange of differing opinions and ideas can be an amazing way to reach a good outcome.  But if you’re afraid to speak up and present your opinion or ideas, this exchange won’t ever happen.

 

Confidence Booster #4: Visualize Success

A technique often taught to sales professionals that you can use to build your confidence is to visualize a successful outcome.  This takes goal-setting an important step farther, as you actually spend a few minutes imaging what success looks like for you in the situation you are faced with.  If you’re entering a job interview, visualizing success means imagining yourself getting the call from the hiring manager to welcome you to the team and offer you that job.  It’s a pretty powerful technique and one I urge you try the next time you’re faced with a situation that challenges your sense of confidence.

 

Confidence Booster #5: Remember Your Victories

Ever heard of an “Attagirl File?” It’s a file, either physical or electronic, where you keep confidence-boosting accolades, thank you notes, awards, and anything that you’ve received that points out a job well-done or makes you feel positive about an action you took.  I call mine “Wins.”  If you don’t have one, start one today and refer to it whenever you need a reminder of how awesome you are.  It’s also handy when you go to update your resume or have a performance review.

 

A few months ago I was invited to lead the discussion on Women Returning to Work at an MBA Women’s Leadership Conference.  My first thought was “Who, me?”  But then I realized that I live this stuff, read about it constantly, write about it weekly, obsess about it and talk about it with everyone I meet. I’m the expert! Yeah, me.

 

So when you see a job that you want, roll up your sleeves and apply, find a connection at the company to put in a good word for you and visualize yourself getting the job after wowing them in the interview.  Be open and awesome!  Yeah, you.